Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bibdigital.epn.edu.ec/handle/15000/17114
Title: Transitions between Andean and Amazonian centers of endemism in the radiation of some arboreal rodents
Authors: Upham, Nathan S.
Ojala-Barbour, Reed
Brito M., Jorge
Velazco, Paúl M.
Patterson, Bruce D.
Keywords: BIOGEOGRAPHY
EX SITU DIVERSIFICATION
MOLECULAR PHYLOGENY
DIVERGENCE TIMING
SOUTH AMERICA
ANDES
AMAZONIA
NEOTROPICS
RODENTIA
ECHIMYIDAE
Issue Date: 2013
Citation: Upham, N. S., R. Ojala-B., J. Brito, P. M. Velazco y B. D. Patterson, 2013. Transitions between Andean and Amazonian centers of endemism in the radiation of some arboreal rodents. BMC Evolutionary Biology 13: 1-24.
Series/Report no.: BMC Evolutionary Biology;13
Abstract: Background: The tropical Andes and Amazon are among the richest regions of endemism for mammals, and each has given rise to extensive in situ radiations. Various animal lineages have radiated ex situ after colonizing one of these regions from the other: Amazonian clades of dendrobatid frogs and passerine birds may have Andean ancestry, and transitions from the Amazon to Andes may be even more common. To examine biogeographic transitions between these regions, we investigated the evolutionary history of three clades of rodents in the family Echimyidae: bamboo rats (Dactylomys-Olallamys-Kannabateomys), spiny tree-rats (Mesomys-Lonchothrix), and brushtailed rats (Isothrix). Each clade is distributed in both the Andes and Amazonia, and is more diverse in the lowlands. We used two mitochondrial (cyt-b and 12S) and three nuclear (GHR, vWF, and RAG1) markers to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships. Tree topologies and ancestral geographic ranges were then used to determine whether Andean forms were basal to or derived from lowland radiations.
URI: http://bibdigital.epn.edu.ec/handle/15000/17114
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